Invited Speakers

 

Prof. Anja Pfennig
HTW-Berlin University of Applied Sciences, Germany

Prof. Anja Pfennig was born in Büdelsdorf, Germany in 1970. She studied Minerology at the Rheinische Friedrich Wilhelms University Bonn, Germany, where she graduated in 1997. Her Ph.-D. in the field of ceramic moulds for liquid metal casting was earned in 2001 from the Friedrich Alexander University of Erlangen, Germany. She then worked for Siemens Energy in charge of ceramic shields for stationary gas turbines and transferred to Berlin in 2008 where she conducted scientific research on the oxidation of high temperature materials and corrosion behavior of steels used in Carbon Capture Techniques. 2009 she became full professor at the Applied University Berlin, HTW where she currently teaches material science for engineering students. Anja Pfennigs research interest and expertise is in the field of corrosion fatigue of materials at high temperature and high pressure simulating geothermal environments.

 

Assoc. Prof. Basil TungLiong Wong
Swinburne University of Technology, Malaysia

Dr. Basil T. Wong obtained his Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering in 1999, Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering with research emphasis on radiation/light scattering in participating media in 2001, and Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering in 2006 at the University of Kentucky, USA. His Ph.D. dissertation topic was on modeling thermal transport due to an impinging electron beam/field emission of electrons from a nanoprobe. Since graduation, he worked as a post-doctoral scholar under Professor M. Pınar Mengüç and focused on research area in the field of near-field radiation, light scattering, and most importantly nanoscale thermal conduction. He joined Swinburne University of Technology, Sarawak as a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Engineering, Computing, and Science in September 2010, and was subsequently promoted to Associate Professor in 2015.
His research interests include theoretical modeling of nanoscale heat transport, heat removal (cooling) at nanoscales, improving solar/thermal photovoltaic cell efficiency (near-field radiation coupled with nanoscale thermal transport), applications of electron-beam, and radiative heat transfer in participating media.